9580/0 Granular cell myoblastoma, NOS


Related terms

Granular cell tumor, NOS

Definitions

Esophagus
ICD-O-3 topography code: C15

Granular cell tumour (GCT) is an unusual, benign or malignant neoplasm characterized by the presence of neoplastic large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm which contains abundant lysosomes. This tumour was originally thought to originate from muscle cells and was named granular cell myoblastoma. Subsequent studies have suggested a derivation from Schwann cells.
GCT can arise in any site of the body, including the posterior pituitary gland, skin, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, heart, mediastinum, and breast, and usually presents as a solitary mass. A minority of patients have multiple tumours. Women are more often affected than men 1
Click to access Pubmed
Ordonez NG (1999)
Granular cell tumor: a review and update.
Adv Anat Pathol 6: 186-203



.

In the oesophagus, granular cell tumours are usually incidental endoscopic findings in the distal oesophagus and measure <1cm. Rare larger examples can cause dysphagia. Incidence is higher in African Americans, and tumour multiplicity is common, as has been previously observed for granular
cell tumours in soft tissue.



Lip, Oral Cavity and Oropharynx
ICD-O-3 topography code: C00-C06, C09-C10, C14

Granular cell tumour (GCT) is an unusual, benign or malignant neoplasm characterized by the presence of neoplastic large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm which contains abundant lysosomes. This tumour was originally thought to originate from muscle cells and was named granular cell myoblastoma. Subsequent studies have suggested a derivation from Schwann cells.
GCT can arise in any site of the body, including the posterior pituitary gland, skin, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, heart, mediastinum, and breast, and usually presents as a solitary mass. A minority of patients have multiple tumours. Women are more often affected than men
2
Click to access Pubmed
Ordonez NG (1999)
Granular cell tumor: a review and update.
Adv Anat Pathol 6: 186-203



.



Breast
ICD-O-3 topography code: C50

A tumour with eosinophilic granular cytoplasm derived from Schwann cells of peripheral nerves.






Stomach
ICD-O-3 topography code: C16

Granular cell tumour (GCT) is an unusual, benign or malignant neoplasm characterized by the presence of neoplastic large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm which contains abundant lysosomes. This tumour was originally thought to originate from muscle cells and was named granular cell myoblastoma. Subsequent studies have suggested a derivation from Schwann cells.
GCT can arise in any site of the body, including the posterior pituitary gland, skin, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, heart, mediastinum, and breast, and usually presents as a solitary mass. A minority of patients have multiple tumours. Women are more often affected than men
9
Click to access Pubmed
Ordonez NG (1999)
Granular cell tumor: a review and update.
Adv Anat Pathol 6: 186-203



.

Gastric localization is very rare. Gastric GCTs can be solitary or, more frequently, associated with other gastrointestinal localization. Although GCTs are usually clinically and histologically benign, some malignant cases have been reported
10
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Patti R, Almasio PL, Di Vita G (2006)
Granular cell tumor of stomach: a case report and review of literature.
World J Gastroenterol 12: 3442-5



.



Hypopharynx, Larynx and Trachea
ICD-O-3 topography code: C13, C32, C33

Granular cell tumour (GCT) is an unusual, benign or malignant neoplasm characterized by the presence of neoplastic large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm which contains abundant lysosomes. This tumour was originally thought to originate from muscle cells and was named granular cell myoblastoma. Subsequent studies have suggested a derivation from Schwann cells.
GCT can arise in any site of the body, including the posterior pituitary gland, skin, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, heart, mediastinum, and breast, and usually presents as a solitary mass. A minority of patients have multiple tumours. Women are more often affected than men
11
Click to access Pubmed
Ordonez NG (1999)
Granular cell tumor: a review and update.
Adv Anat Pathol 6: 186-203



.



Prostate gland
ICD-O-3 topography code: C61

Granular cell tumour (GCT) is an unusual, benign or malignant neoplasm characterized by the presence of neoplastic large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm which contains abundant lysosomes. This tumour was originally thought to originate from muscle cells and was named granular cell myoblastoma. Subsequent studies have suggested a derivation from Schwann cells.
GCT can arise in any site of the body, including the posterior pituitary gland, skin, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, heart, mediastinum, and breast, and usually presents as a solitary mass. A minority of patients have multiple tumours. Women are more often affected than men
12
Click to access Pubmed
Ordonez NG (1999)
Granular cell tumor: a review and update.
Adv Anat Pathol 6: 186-203



.



Gallbladder and extrahepatic biliary tract
ICD-O-3 topography code: C23-C24.0

Granular cell tumour (GCT) is an unusual, benign or malignant neoplasm characterized by the presence of neoplastic large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm which contains abundant lysosomes. This tumour was originally thought to originate from muscle cells and was named granular cell myoblastoma. Subsequent studies have suggested a derivation from Schwann cells. GCT can arise in any site of the body, including the posterior pituitary gland, skin, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, heart, mediastinum, and breast, and usually presents as a solitary mass. A minority of patients have multiple tumours. Women are more often affected than men
13
Click to access Pubmed
Ordonez NG (1999)
Granular cell tumor: a review and update.
Adv Anat Pathol 6: 186-203



.

GCT of the gallbladder and extrahepatic biliary tract
Although rare, granular cell tumour is the most commonly diagnosed benign nonepithelial tumour of the gallbladder and extrahepatic biliary tract. In the gallbladder, such tumours are usually incidental microscopic findings, whereas granular cell tumours in the bile ducts can cause symptomatic biliary obstruction that clinically mimics bile duct carcinoma
14
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te Boekhorst DS, Gerhards MF, van Gulik TM, Gouma DJ (2000)
Granular cell tumor at the hepatic duct confluence mimicking Klatskin tumor. A report of two cases and a review of the literature.
Dig Surg 17: 299-303



.
Granular cell tumours can be multicentric, involving different visceral sites as well as the skin and peripheral soft tissues. Involvement of the bile ducts often results in a concentric or eccentric mass that variably obliterates the lumen. Histologically, granular cell tumours contain clusters or sheets of polygonal cells with abundant periodic acid?Schiff (PAS)-positive granular cytoplasm and small nuclei. The cells are immunohistochemically positive for S100 protein and α-inhibin
15
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Murakata LA, Ishak KG (2001)
Expression of inhibin-alpha by granular cell tumors of the gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts.
Am J Surg Pathol 25: 1200-3



.



Colon and rectum
ICD-O-3 topography code: C18-C20

An unusual benign or malignant neoplasm characterized by the presence of neoplastic large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm which contains abundant lysosomes. It affects females more often than males and usually presents as a solitary mass. A minority of patients have multiple tumors. Granular cell tumours can arise from many anatomic sites including the posterior pituitary gland, skin, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, heart, mediastinum, and breast. This tumour was originally thought to originate from muscle cells and was named granular cell myoblastoma. Subsequent studies have suggested a derivation from Schwann cells.

Granular cell tumour of colon and rectum
These tumours usually present as small mucosal nodules incidentally detected at endoscopy. Multiple lesions can be present, and occurrence together with peripheral granular cell tumours is also possible. The neoplastic component consists of large cells with small nuclei and abundant, granular cytoplasm that is positive for PAS and S100 protein
16
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Melo CR, Melo IS, Schmitt FC, Fagundes R, Amendola D (1993)
Multicentric granular cell tumor of the colon: report of a patient with 52 tumors.
Am J Gastroenterol 88: 1785-7



17
Click to access Pubmed
Sohn DK, Choi HS, Chang YS, Huh JM, Kim DH, Kim DY, Kim YH, Chang HJ, Jung KH, Jeong SY (2004)
Granular cell tumor of colon: report of a case and review of literature.
World J Gastroenterol 10: 2452-4



18
 
Bosman FT, Carneiro F, Hruban RH, Theise ND (Eds.)
WHO Classification of Tumours of the Digestive System.
4th Edition
International Agency for Research on Cancer: Lyon 2010



.



Vulva
ICD-O-3 topography code: C51

Granular cell tumour (GCT) is an unusual, benign or malignant neoplasm characterized by the presence of neoplastic large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm which contains abundant lysosomes. This tumour was originally thought to originate from muscle cells and was named granular cell myoblastoma. Subsequent studies have suggested a derivation from Schwann cells.
GCT can arise in any site of the body, including the posterior pituitary gland, skin, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, heart, mediastinum, and breast, and usually presents as a solitary mass. A minority of patients have multiple tumours. Women are more often affected than men
19
Click to access Pubmed
Ordonez NG (1999)
Granular cell tumor: a review and update.
Adv Anat Pathol 6: 186-203



.



Skin
ICD-O-3 topography code: C44

Granular cell tumour (GCT) is an unusual, benign or malignant neoplasm characterized by the presence of neoplastic large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm which contains abundant lysosomes. This tumour was originally thought to originate from muscle cells and was named granular cell myoblastoma. Subsequent studies have suggested a derivation from Schwann cells.
GCT can arise in any site of the body, including the posterior pituitary gland, skin, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, heart, mediastinum, and breast, and usually presents as a solitary mass. A minority of patients have multiple tumours. Women are more often affected than men
20
Click to access Pubmed
Ordonez NG (1999)
Granular cell tumor: a review and update.
Adv Anat Pathol 6: 186-203



.



Connective, subcutaneous and other soft tissues
ICD-O-3 topography code: C49

An unusual benign or malignant neoplasm characterized by the presence of neoplastic large polygonal cells with granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm which contains abundant lysosomes. It affects females more often than males and usually presents as a solitary mass. A minority of patients have multiple tumors. Granular cell tumours can arise from many anatomic sites including the posterior pituitary gland, skin, oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, heart, mediastinum, and breast.
This tumour was originally thought to originate from muscle cells and was named granular cell myoblastoma. Subsequent studies have suggested a derivation from Schwann cells.