9230/0 Chondroblastoma, NOS


Synonyms

Chondromatous giant cell tumor
Codman tumor

Definitions

Bone
ICD-O-3 topography code: C40-C41

Chondroblastoma is a benign, lytic neoplasm usually arising from the cartilage in epiphysis and metaphysis of immature bone. In more than 75% of cases, the long bones are affected; the most common sites are distal and proximal femur, proximal tibia, and proximal humerus. The tumours are relatively small (3 to 6 cm), sharply demarcated, and may have a thin sclerotic border. The presence of a sclerotic rim, along with the younger age of the patients, helps to differentiate chondroblastoma from giant cell tumor of bone, which generally lacks a sclerotic border and occurs in patients older than 20 years.
The characteristic cells are uniform, round to polygonal chondroblasts. Other typical features are osteoclast-like giant cells, myxoid stroma formation, calcification, and mitotic activity 1
 
Fletcher CDM, Unni KK, Mertens F (Eds.)
World Health Organization Classification of Tumours. Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of Soft Tissue and Bone.
3rd Edition
IARC Press: Lyon 2002



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Chondroblastoma occurs most frequently in children and young adults (10-25 years of age), with a higher incidence in males. More than 80% of chondroblastomas are successfully treated by simple curettage with bone grafting. Local recurrence rates are 14-18% and occur usually within two years
2
 
Fletcher CDM, Unni KK, Mertens F (Eds.)
World Health Organization Classification of Tumours. Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of Soft Tissue and Bone.
3rd Edition
IARC Press: Lyon 2002



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Nasal cavity and Sinuses
ICD-O-3 topography code: C30-C31

A benign, lytic neoplasm usually arising from the cartilage in epiphysis and metaphysis of bone. It is a well circumscribed tumor characterized by the presence of chondroblasts, osteoclast-like giant cells, myxoid stroma formation, calcification, and mitotic activity. In aggressive cases, there is rearrangement of the 8q21 chromosome band. The tumor occurs most frequently in children and young adults.